Alipay and seven other Chinese apps are banned by Trump

An executive order banning transactions with eight Chinese apps has been signed by US President Donald Trump.

The applications include Alipay, the common payment site, as well as QQ Wallet and WeChat Pay.

The order, which takes effect in 45 days, says that because they are a threat to US national security, the apps are being banned.

It flags the risk that the apps may be used on US federal employees to track and develop dossiers.

In the order, which only kicks in after Mr Trump has left office, Tencent QQ, CamScanner, SHAREit, VMate and WPS Office are also included.

“By accessing personal electronic devices such as smartphones, tablets, and computers, Chinese connected software applications can access and capture vast swaths of information from users, including sensitive personally identifiable information and private information.”Chinese connected software applications can access and capture vast swaths of user information, including sensitive personal identifiable information and private information, by accessing personal electronic devices such as smartphones, tablets, and computers.

In its final months in office, the Trump administration has increased pressure on Chinese firms, particularly those it considers to be a national security danger.

President Trump has signed executive orders against a range of Chinese firms arguing they could share data with the Chinese government.

Among the victims of Washington’s crackdown were Chinese social media app TikTok and telecoms giant Huawei.

Last month, dozens of Chinese firms, including the country’s top chipmaker SMIC and drone manufacturer DJI Technology, were added to a trade blacklist by the Commerce Department.

The administration has also prohibited the purchasing of sensitive US products and technologies by a number of Chinese and Russian firms with suspected military links.

China has repeatedly dismissed accusations that these companies share their data with the Chinese government and has responded by introducing its own export legislation banning military technology exports.

The US ordered ByteDance, the owner of TikTok, a social media app, to either shut down or sell off its US properties in August.

The US has yet to shut down the app, in the lack of a deadline to complete the sale, and discussions continue over its future.